Sweet Briar College (Sweet Briar, VA)
Mar
18
6:30 PM18:30

Sweet Briar College (Sweet Briar, VA)

Sweet Briar College’s Common Read selection for the 2019-2020 academic year features not one book, but a pair of books “in dynamic and rich conversation with one another across thousands of years,” says Director of the Center for Creativity, Design and the Arts Carrie Brown. They are Madeline Miller’s No. 1 New York Times best-selling novel “Circe” — about the legendary sorceress and goddess who (among other things) turns men into pigs in “The Odyssey” — and Emily Wilson’s celebrated translation of “The Odyssey.”

The writers will visit campus and bookend the year: Madeline Miller on Thursday, Nov. 7, and Emily Wilson on Wednesday, March 18, 2020. Their presentations are free and open to the public.

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College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, Massachusetts) Thomas More Lectures on the Humanities
Mar
24
4:03 PM16:03

College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, Massachusetts) Thomas More Lectures on the Humanities

  • Seelos Theatre College of the Holy Cross (map)
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The Thomas More Lectures on the Humanities explore ways the humanities illuminate moral dilemmas, enhance our capacity for understanding and empathy, and help us to imagine more just ways of living.

March 24, 2020, 4:30 p.m., Seelos Theatre
War, Homecoming, Heroism, Truth

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Who Belongs at Home? Kamila Shamsie in convo w/ Emily Wilson (Philadelphia, PA)
Oct
16
5:00 PM17:00

Who Belongs at Home? Kamila Shamsie in convo w/ Emily Wilson (Philadelphia, PA)

Wolf Humanities Center at the University of Pennsylvania

Kamila Shamsie, Dr. S.T. Lee Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities

Kamila Shamsie’s seventh novel Home Fire follows three orphaned British Muslim siblings who struggle in different ways with their relationship to the State, after one of them is enticed into becoming a jihadist. Shamsie considers family, nation, and faith in today’s age of terror against the backdrop of  Sophocles’ tragedy Antigone, in which two sisters respond differently to the legal consequences of their brother’s act of treason. Home Fire received the 2018 Women's Prize for Fiction and was longlisted for the 2017 Man Booker Prize.

Joining Ms. Shamsie will be Penn Classical Studies Professor Emily Wilson, whose poetic translation of Homer’s Odyssey illuminates family and social relationships in this ancient text, and the complicated kinship between antiquity and modernity. Shamsie and Wilson will explore the many meanings of home and homecoming, and how violence, colonialism, and war affect identity and community across national and cultural boundaries. Book signing to follow.

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Library of Congress National Book Festival (Washington, DC)
Aug
31
7:05 PM19:05

Library of Congress National Book Festival (Washington, DC)

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Panel: The Enduring Appeal of the Odyssey

Alberto Manguel discusses "Homer’s The Iliad and The Odyssey: A Biography" (Grove), Madeline Miller discusses "Circe" (Little, Brown) and Emily Wilson discusses her translation of "The Odyssey" (Norton) in a panel conversation. Introduced by: Amy Stolls.

Emily Wilson book signing August 31 2019 at 230, Line #14,

https://www.loc.gov/events/2019-national-book-festival/schedule/item/event-395797/emily-wilson-book-signing-line-no-14/2019-08-31/

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The Odyssey: A Staged Reading and Discussion (Brooklyn, NY)
Mar
15
7:30 PM19:30

The Odyssey: A Staged Reading and Discussion (Brooklyn, NY)

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT BUT A LIMITED NUMBER OF STAND-BY TICKETS WILL BE AVAILABLE.

The Odyssey: A Staged Reading and Discussion
Date/Time: March 15th, 7.30pm
Venue: Fishman Space, BAM Fisher (321 Ashland Pl, Brooklyn, NY 11217)

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT BUT A LIMITED NUMBER OF STAND-BY TICKETS WILL BE AVAILABLE.

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Key West Literary Seminar (Florida)
Jan
11
9:45 AM09:45

Key West Literary Seminar (Florida)

Each year, the Key West Literary Seminar explores a particular literary theme. For our 37th event, January 10-13, 2019, we’ll assemble some of today’s most dazzling writers for a journey through literary archetypes—from Shakespeare and Homer to African folktales and early 20th-century novels and comic-book heroes—as we seek to understand the nature of literary influence.

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Franklin & Marshall College (Lancaster, PA)
Dec
6
11:30 AM11:30

Franklin & Marshall College (Lancaster, PA)

DECEMBER 06 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Mayser Gymnasium

Emily Wilson 

Common Hour enables the entire Franklin & Marshall College community to gather for culturally and academically enriching events at midday each Thursday during the academic year. This opportunity to engage in a campus-wide dialogue originates with Common Hour and then extends beyond the confines of 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. into classrooms, house commons, dining halls and beyond.  

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Miami Book Fair (Miami, FL USA)
Nov
17
2:30 PM14:30

Miami Book Fair (Miami, FL USA)

With unforgettably vivid characters, mesmerizing language and page-turning suspense, Madeline Miller’s Circe is an intoxicating epic of family rivalry, palace intrigue, love and loss, as well as a celebration of indomitable female strength in a man’s world. In Emily Wilson’s fresh, authoritative version of the first English translation of The Odyssey by a woman, this stirring tale of shipwrecks, monsters, and magic comes alive in an entirely new way.

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New York Society Library (New York, NY)
Nov
14
6:30 PM18:30

New York Society Library (New York, NY)

Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - 6:30 PM | Members' Room | open to the public | $15 per person | registration required

The first great adventure story in the Western canon, The Odyssey is a poem about violence and the aftermath of war; about wealth, poverty, and power; about marriage and family; about travelers, hospitality, and the yearning for home.

In this fresh, authoritative version—the work’s first English translation by a woman—this stirring tale of shipwrecks, monsters, and magic comes alive in an entirely new way. Written in iambic pentameter verse and a vivid, contemporary idiom, this engrossing translation matches the number of lines in the Greek original, thus striding at Homer’s sprightly pace and singing with a voice that echoes Homer’s music.

Its characters are unforgettable, from the cunning goddess Athena, whose interventions guide and protect the hero, to the awkward teenage son, Telemachus, who struggles to achieve adulthood and find his father; from the cautious, clever, and miserable Penelope, who somehow keeps clamoring suitors at bay during her husband’s long absence, to the “complicated” hero himself, a man of many disguises, many tricks, and many moods, who emerges in this translation as a more fully rounded human being than ever before. This is an Odyssey that will be treasured by a new generation of scholars, students, and general readers alike.

Emily Wilson grew up in Oxford, UK, and studied Classics at Balliol College, and English Literature at Corpus Christi College. Her PhD. is from Yale in Classics and Comparative Literature. She is currently a Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. She has written books on tragedy and “overliving,” the long afterlife of the death of Socrates, and a life of Seneca. She has also done several verse translations of classical verse drama and epic, including Seneca’s tragedies, four plays of Euripides, and Homer’s Odyssey.

To register, use the form below. With registration questions, call the Events Office at 212.288.6900 x230.

Price 

$15.00

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